Sign Up For Our Free Monthly Newsletter

Friday, April 18, 2014

Rub Rip (Lawrence Frank Set Play)

www.bestbasketballnotes.blogspot.com www.scoutinghoops.com

While Lawrence Frank may not be currently employed as an NBA coach, his X's and O's acumen cannot be questioned. This is a basic rub set that he used to run when he was head coach of the New Jersey Nets. Coming down out of transition he had his point guard cross sides of the floor (already shown in the diagram) to give his point guard an attack right out of the gate.

Transition looks:
1) Pass ahead layup
2) Pass ahead hitting the rim runner
3) Pass ahead pick and roll
4) Rub series out of transition.

The very first diagram shows the basic rub set. Off of that look is a play called Rub Rip (the Rip call signifying a pick and roll).

 The 3 man then looks to set a for backscreen for the 4 man who looks for a layup. The ball is then passed up for 3 who can bomb if he is open.
 If he is not open for the shot, he comes off of a ballscreen from the 5 man. The 4 man replaces and the 2 man fills to the corner.

Coaches, 

Remember that while it is always important to find the next best set, it is MORE important that the sets you run put your players in the best position to score, and what is MOST important is that your players are developing their skills to enhance their ability. Hopefully you enjoyed this post, if you did or did not let me know! If you have any request please message me on Twitter and I will happily post what you are looking for.

Have an excellent Easter and enjoy the start of the NBA playoffs!
@jacobcollins34

Friday, April 4, 2014

Final Four Coaches Spotlight: Billy D-Utilizing the 3pt shot

www.bestbasketballnotes.blogspot.com www.scoutinghoops.com

In part of a continuing series by looking at some of the pet sets of coaches in the Final Four, today we look at Billy Donovan. Coach Donovan was immortalized as a player by utilizing the 3pt shot to propel Providence to the Final Four. As a coach, he has put an emphasis on 1) utilizing the 3pt shot on the offense and 2) not allowing the 3pt shot when on defense. Here are two plays that Billy D has utilized this season and in the past to get an open 3 pointer.

This first set is a pick and roll counter to free up a stretch 4, or to hit the 3 man for an open jumper in the corner.




This play is to free up the 2 guard for an open jumper, although you could easily run it to the opposite side for the 3 man. This play is great and really forces the defense to make some tough decisions on what they guard.




Coaches, hope you enjoy these plays and the Final Four action this weekend!

Want these plays on your FastDraw? Contact me on twitter (@jacobcollins34) and I would be more than happy to email them to you directly. 


Thursday, April 3, 2014

Final Four Coaches Spotlight

www.bestbasketballnotes.blogspot.com www.scoutinghoops.com

In reviving the posts and interest in Basketball Coaches' Club, I feel like the best way to re-energize the site is by taking time to look at some of the plays that got us to where we are: the Final Four. Bo Ryan, Billy Donovan, John Calipari, and Kevin Ollie all have different styles and have found success in many different ways.

This play is from Kentucky coach John Calipari and it has been used several times this postseason, often several possessions in a row. It is based on the ability to get a strong drive into the paint, from multiple players. It begins in a Horns set, by setting a ballscreen for attacking point guard Andrew Harrison. He comes hard off the screen looking to attack the rim, with the 5 man looking for a lob or duck in off of the roll. Julius Randle, the 4 man pops to the top of the key, to receive a pass from Harrison. He now looks to create by following Harrison's drive, by using his strong hand, size, speed, and strength to get to the rack.



Coaches if you have FastDraw, feel free to contact me on twitter (@jacobcollins34) so I can get your e-mail to FastTrade you these plays! Enjoy!

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

Princeton Offense Breakdown: Chin Series

This is the first in a basketball clinic series where we will break down the Princeton Offense and we begin with the popular Chin series. There are many variations of this play and it is ran at every level including the NBA. Buy the ebook with the entire offense including side out of bounds and press breaks here for $30 Princeton Offense Ebook or for more information about this ebook, read here



Frame 1: Chin begins with a dribble weave on the strongside between the 1 and the 3 takes the handoff and dribbles back to the guard position. On the weakside, the 2 and the 4 exchange. The post fills the strongside elbow.

•Frame 2: The 3 and the 4 pass across the top as the 4 passes the ball to the 2 on the wing.


COACHES POINT: 3 does not cut off 5 until ball leaves the 4. If the 2 is denied then 4 has the opportunity to dribble at 2 for the backdoor cut.


This is the start of the screening action that makes this play successful. 5 sets a backscreen for 3 cutting to the rim for a layup then immediately goes to set a flare screen for the 4. 2 looks for 3 for the layup or the 4 man off the flare screen

• Frame 3: If the 2 has no passing options then the ball is dribbled up back to the guard spot. The 1 fills the guard spot to receive the ball. The 4 after the flare cut, finishes the cut to the rim looking for the ball, then fills the wing position vacated by 1. The 3 fills up to the wing spot.

• Frame 4: The action continues to the other side as the ball is reversed from the 2 to the 1 to the 4. The 2 makes a weakside UCLA cut off the 5 to the rim looking to score.

The continuity continues until a shot is taken or a shift to another phase.

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Building Positive Relationships with Your Players

By Matt Monroe, Sophomore Boys’ Basketball Coach, St. Patrick High School (IL)

An essential part of coaching is building relationships. We, as coaches, spend a lot of time diagramming plays and developing new drills, but we don’t spend enough time trying to figure out how to better foster relationships with our players. The greatest compliment a coach can receive is “his/her players will run through a brick wall for him/her.” The question is: how do coaches develop strong enough relationships with their players that drive such a spirit?

1. Show them that you care.
Always remind your players that you care about them. You must show them that you understand their condition, that you always have their best interests in mind, and that they can trust you. Understand that developing relationships with your players transcends basketball. You must show interest in their lives off the court – ask them about their day, their families, or how their classes are going. If your players feel that you are invested in them as people, they will buy into you as a coach. Don’t just tell your players that you care, show them!

2. Be their friend, not their “buddy.”
Make sure that your players feel that you are approachable. Have fun with them, and at times joke around to show your lighter side. Develop a relationship with your players so that they feel that they can confide in you during times of crisis or so that they feel compelled to share with you when something good happens in their lives. Even with all of this, remember that you are not their “buddy.” There needs to be a figurative line in place that maintains the distinction between player and coach. If you become their “buddy,” you will lose their respect as a coach and authoritative figure.

3. Give them ownership.
It’s very important to give your players ownership in your team and your program. You and your staff will make all of the major decisions and will have the final say, but it is important to get as much player input as possible. You can create a sense of ownership by trying the following:
- Ask them to decide on a team shoe or other gear.
- Get their opinion on the summer tournaments your program is in.
- Find out what the “pulse” of the team is at various points throughout the year. Ask them how they feel about their team.
- Have your players construct some team rules.
- Have players fill out a program and/or team questionnaire.
- Ask players to share their “scouting report” of another team or player if they know pertinent information about your opponent.
- There are a wide variety of options that you can use. Be creative!
- If your players feel like they have stock in your program, the success of your team becomes more important to them.

4. Remember that it’s about them.
Don’t lose sight of your purpose as a coach. If you got into coaching to make money or gain professional notoriety, then you are in it for all of the wrong reasons. Your primary purpose as a coach is to help your players develop positively as players and as young men and women. It should be about THEM. If you make it as such, players won’t have to be reminded too often that you have their best interests in mind.

5. We and us, not me and I.
You must try to talk in the form of “we” and “us” and try to avoid always referencing “me” and “I.” It’s OUR team, OUR loss, OUR big win. WE need to get better. OUR man scored. WE need to take better shots. If you speak in terms of “we” and “us,” it will help bring everyone together to reach common goals.

6. Reinforce good habits and actions.
Don’t always comment on the negative. Make sure you always reinforce the positive. This can be very difficult to do at times, but make sure you make an attempt. Coaches who are too negative often times will “lose” their players.

Relationship building can be very difficult to accomplish successfully. It takes up a lot of time and effort and requires much patience. Sometimes the process won’t always go the way you think it should or want it to. Even with all of the work and struggle that it may be, you must always attempt to develop positive relationships with your players. Without the foundation of positive relationships with your athletes, even the best of coaching will fall on deaf ears.

HoopsRoundtable.com
@HoopsRoundtable on Twitter
@CoachMMonroe on Twitter

Wednesday, July 20, 2011

"HOW TO SCRIMMAGE" by Gregg Popovich of the San Antonio Spurs

"HOW TO SCRIMMAGE"
BY GREGG POPOVICH OF THE SAN ANTONIO SPURS
Coaches you have got to try this drill. It is called "3 Ways" *You can run this drill for 30 minutes if you want to. (This is a controlled Scrimmage)

1. This is a five on five drill full court. Team A against Team B

2. You play to ten points. You get one point for scoring and one point for a stop. *Even if a kid makes a three point shot it counts one point. (You will need a score keeper)

3. Team A is on offense and Team B is on defense. You call a set and throw the ball to team A's point guard. They will run the play, now we are in regular basketball going full court. Team B will now try and score on the far end of the floor and then Team A will come back to the original end and try and score here (do you see 3 Ways?) (This is a great time to work on your secondary break)

4. After they go down and back (Team A would have been on offense twice) they will throw the ball to you the coach and you will start over again, but this time Team B will be on offense first?

5. If the ball goes out of bounds under a goal you can run an out of bounds play.

6. Coach Popovich likes this drill because he is controlling the scrimmage and they are not just ripping and running while scrimmaging out of control. You can teach after they go down and back.

Source: Basketball Coaches' Club: The X's and O's of a Five-Star Coach

Source: Basketball Coaches' Club: The X's and O's of a Five-Star Coach

"HOW TO SCRIMMAGE" by Gregg Popovich of the San Antonio Spurs

"HOW TO SCRIMMAGE"
BY GREGG POPOVICH OF THE SAN ANTONIO SPURS
Coaches you have got to try this drill. It is called "3 Ways" *You can run this drill for 30 minutes if you want to. (This is a controlled Scrimmage)

1. This is a five on five drill full court. Team A against Team B

2. You play to ten points. You get one point for scoring and one point for a stop. *Even if a kid makes a three point shot it counts one point. (You will need a score keeper)

3. Team A is on offense and Team B is on defense. You call a set and throw the ball to team A's point guard. They will run the play, now we are in regular basketball going full court. Team B will now try and score on the far end of the floor and then Team A will come back to the original end and try and score here (do you see 3 Ways?) (This is a great time to work on your secondary break)

4. After they go down and back (Team A would have been on offense twice) they will throw the ball to you the coach and you will start over again, but this time Team B will be on offense first?

5. If the ball goes out of bounds under a goal you can run an out of bounds play.

6. Coach Popovich likes this drill because he is controlling the scrimmage and they are not just ripping and running while scrimmaging out of control. You can teach after they go down and back.

Source: Basketball Coaches' Club: The X's and O's of a Five-Star Coach

"HOW TO SCRIMMAGE" by Gregg Popovich of the San Antonio Spurs

"HOW TO SCRIMMAGE"
BY GREGG POPOVICH OF THE SAN ANTONIO SPURS
Coaches you have got to try this drill. It is called "3 Ways" *You can run this drill for 30 minutes if you want to. (This is a controlled Scrimmage)

1. This is a five on five drill full court. Team A against Team B

2. You play to ten points. You get one point for scoring and one point for a stop. *Even if a kid makes a three point shot it counts one point. (You will need a score keeper)

3. Team A is on offense and Team B is on defense. You call a set and throw the ball to team A's point guard. They will run the play, now we are in regular basketball going full court. Team B will now try and score on the far end of the floor and then Team A will come back to the original end and try and score here (do you see 3 Ways?) (This is a great time to work on your secondary break)

4. After they go down and back (Team A would have been on offense twice) they will throw the ball to you the coach and you will start over again, but this time Team B will be on offense first?

5. If the ball goes out of bounds under a goal you can run an out of bounds play.

6. Coach Popovich likes this drill because he is controlling the scrimmage and they are not just ripping and running while scrimmaging out of control. You can teach after they go down and back.

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Strange Championship Game

www.bestbasketballnotes.blogspot.com www.scoutinghoops.com

Connecticut versus Butler.
Dogs versus dogs.
Correct season(#9 in Big East standings) versus correct season(13-5 in conference play)
A #3 seed versus a #8 seed.

What can we expect from that game?

Well, for a lot of people, that was one of the most horrible National Championship Game of all time. For coaches, maybe you did not see the execution you would’ve like to. For Kemba fans, you were happy he won MOP Trophy, but he didn’t have an incredible night. But for an analyst, a hardcore hoop-junkie or a defense militant, you had a real good time watching that game, and you watched it over and over again.

Shot were definitely not falling for both of these teams, but they had the shot they wanted most of the time. From a Butler standpoint, the execution was just awesome… Now it’s too easy to say: `` Why did they feed their bigs first on most possessions? That big white guy couldn’t make a single lay-up``.

Well, I will leave that up to Coach Stevens.
However, Butler got a lot of quality looks to the rack, against a ridiculously superior team in terms of size, strength and athleticism. UConn also had way more pure talent.
When you look at the Bulldogs defense, words that come to mind are solid, physical, communication and collective effort. Every defender is on the same page. If you still don’t know what I am talking about, just look at their out-of-bounds defense. It’s perfect. They didn’t get scored of the Huskies’ first out-of-bounds (under the basket) option a single time ; UConn are known for having great stack baseline out-of-bounds plays, and scoring right away.

We thought Kemba and Lamb couldn’t be matched up: wrong.
We thought UConn would destroy Butler from the inside: wrong.

If we look at Calhoun’ squad, they had a remarkable run to the Championship, and congratulations to them. They had great defensive possessions, they ran their sets the way they wanted (except for the fact that Butler were too physical at times). They just couldn’t execute most of their out-of-bounds plays.

The offensive end:
• Butler used a lot of last year’ sets. In addition to post their big guys up, Coach S tried to get Shelvin Mack involved a lot on the perimeter. One sad thing is that Matt Howard never really got started. His refreshing perimeter pop-game could’ve made the difference, but the lack of post-ups did not help the Bulldogs. However, both thumbs up to Butler’s rebounding, winning the offensive battle 20 to 17 !
• Connecticut’s plays were versatile: at one time, they will try to give their big post-ups; at other times, they will spend all 24 seconds trying to get Kemba Walker a shot. Coming out of screens, the Huskies struggled to match Butler’s physical play, plus(+) Butler’ switching defense didn’t help them with the number of screens the Huskies set.

Finally, that game was fun to watch, and analyze. The next 26 plays are the ones both teams ran during the Final Game. They did not score on every one of them, but like I said, both Butler and UConn had good looks to the basket. Even if the defensive end was incredible, we cannot ignore the fact that the offensive performance was very poor. At times, Butler/UConn looked like they only relied on their pick-and-roll isolation game to score.

http://www.hoopjunkies.net/  for the whole analysis.                 www.twitter.com/hoopjunkies  follow us!

Monday, December 13, 2010

My own crunch-time.

www.bestbasketballnotes.blogspot.comwww.scoutinghoops.com

Coaches,

Today's post is exciting. It's about my latest (last sunday's afternoon game) crunch-time situation, and how I managed it. I give you the two crunch-time plays I ran.

http://www.box.net/shared/qa0na7ljz2

Please read it carefully, and give us your comments/opinions / suggestions ! We will be posting the best ones !!!

hoopjunkies@hotmail.com

Coach M

Basketball Coaches Club

©2007-2008 Basketball Coaches Club. Lee DeForest
All rights reserved.